Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

2 × Two Conditions, Two Valves Two Conditions, Two Valves There are two styles of compression valve commonly used in sink hookups. When the water pipe enters the sink cabinet through the back wall, a right-angle-stop valve is required to make the 90-degree turn to the faucet. When it enters through the floor, no turn is needed so a straight-stop valve is used. You must also consider the type of pipe that supplies water to the sink. If it’s made of 1/2-in. rigid copper, you’ll need a compression fitting to connect the valve. If the piping is threaded galvanized iron, use a valve that has female iron-pipe threads. Here, we’ll show two different installations: adding an angle-stop valve to galvanized iron pipe and putting a straight-stop valve onto copper pipe. Note that angle- and straight-stop valves are available for both copper and iron piping. Angle-Stop Valve Your first step is to shut off the water to the entire house at the meter. Drain the system by opening the sink and tub faucets on the lowest floor. Some water might remain in the system, so keep a small bucket handy. Next, use a wrench to loosen the water-supply tube from the adapter. Break the 3/8-in. compression nut free with the wrench, then twist it off with your fingers (step 1). To disconnect the other end of the supply tube from the faucet, use a basin wrench (step 2). The long handle of this wrench allows you to reach up behind the sink bowl and grab onto the faucet’s coupling nut. With the water-supply tube removed, use a pipe wrench to grip the threaded galvanized pipe stub coming out of the wall. Then use an adjustable wrench to unthread the old adapter from the pipe stub (step 3). Take a wire brush and clean away hardened pipe dope from the pipe threads. Brush on a fresh coat of pipe-joint compound (step 4), then thread on the new valve (step 5). Tighten the valve using the adjustable wrench, but be sure to backhold the pipe stub with a pipe wrench. Lubricate the threads of the angle-stop valve with pipe-joint compound and attach the new flexible supply tube (step 6). Connect the opposite end of the tube to the faucet with the basin wrench.
bathroom sink shut off valve 1

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

Two Conditions, Two Valves There are two styles of compression valve commonly used in sink hookups. When the water pipe enters the sink cabinet through the back wall, a right-angle-stop valve is required to make the 90-degree turn to the faucet. When it enters through the floor, no turn is needed so a straight-stop valve is used. You must also consider the type of pipe that supplies water to the sink. If it’s made of 1/2-in. rigid copper, you’ll need a compression fitting to connect the valve. If the piping is threaded galvanized iron, use a valve that has female iron-pipe threads. Here, we’ll show two different installations: adding an angle-stop valve to galvanized iron pipe and putting a straight-stop valve onto copper pipe. Note that angle- and straight-stop valves are available for both copper and iron piping. Angle-Stop Valve Your first step is to shut off the water to the entire house at the meter. Drain the system by opening the sink and tub faucets on the lowest floor. Some water might remain in the system, so keep a small bucket handy. Next, use a wrench to loosen the water-supply tube from the adapter. Break the 3/8-in. compression nut free with the wrench, then twist it off with your fingers (step 1). To disconnect the other end of the supply tube from the faucet, use a basin wrench (step 2). The long handle of this wrench allows you to reach up behind the sink bowl and grab onto the faucet’s coupling nut. With the water-supply tube removed, use a pipe wrench to grip the threaded galvanized pipe stub coming out of the wall. Then use an adjustable wrench to unthread the old adapter from the pipe stub (step 3). Take a wire brush and clean away hardened pipe dope from the pipe threads. Brush on a fresh coat of pipe-joint compound (step 4), then thread on the new valve (step 5). Tighten the valve using the adjustable wrench, but be sure to backhold the pipe stub with a pipe wrench. Lubricate the threads of the angle-stop valve with pipe-joint compound and attach the new flexible supply tube (step 6). Connect the opposite end of the tube to the faucet with the basin wrench.
bathroom sink shut off valve 2

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

There are two styles of compression valve commonly used in sink hookups. When the water pipe enters the sink cabinet through the back wall, a right-angle-stop valve is required to make the 90-degree turn to the faucet. When it enters through the floor, no turn is needed so a straight-stop valve is used. You must also consider the type of pipe that supplies water to the sink. If it’s made of 1/2-in. rigid copper, you’ll need a compression fitting to connect the valve. If the piping is threaded galvanized iron, use a valve that has female iron-pipe threads. Here, we’ll show two different installations: adding an angle-stop valve to galvanized iron pipe and putting a straight-stop valve onto copper pipe. Note that angle- and straight-stop valves are available for both copper and iron piping. Angle-Stop Valve Your first step is to shut off the water to the entire house at the meter. Drain the system by opening the sink and tub faucets on the lowest floor. Some water might remain in the system, so keep a small bucket handy. Next, use a wrench to loosen the water-supply tube from the adapter. Break the 3/8-in. compression nut free with the wrench, then twist it off with your fingers (step 1). To disconnect the other end of the supply tube from the faucet, use a basin wrench (step 2). The long handle of this wrench allows you to reach up behind the sink bowl and grab onto the faucet’s coupling nut. With the water-supply tube removed, use a pipe wrench to grip the threaded galvanized pipe stub coming out of the wall. Then use an adjustable wrench to unthread the old adapter from the pipe stub (step 3). Take a wire brush and clean away hardened pipe dope from the pipe threads. Brush on a fresh coat of pipe-joint compound (step 4), then thread on the new valve (step 5). Tighten the valve using the adjustable wrench, but be sure to backhold the pipe stub with a pipe wrench. Lubricate the threads of the angle-stop valve with pipe-joint compound and attach the new flexible supply tube (step 6). Connect the opposite end of the tube to the faucet with the basin wrench.
bathroom sink shut off valve 3

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

Shutoff valves are often located under sink cabinets. Sinks have shutoff valves attached to their pipes that allow you to turn off the water in one location instead of the entire house when you need to work on the sink plumbing. Sink shutoff valves can freeze or stiffen due to mineral buildup or disuse. The packing nut of the valve, also called the bonnet nut, is unscrewed to loosen the shutoff valve knob and make it easier to turn. google_ad_channel = ‘6887971154’; google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘1’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘180×150’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_skip = google_adnum; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored link’; 1Turn off the water supply at the house meter. 2Grasp the bonnet nut, located directly under or next to the knob of the shutoff valve, with an adjustable wrench. Grasp the knob of the shutoff valve with another adjustable wrench. 3Hold the knob of the shutoff valve in place with one wrench while you turn the bonnet nut counterclockwise with the other adjustable wrench. Try to move the valve knob after each turn. Stop turning the bonnet nut when the valve knob is loose and turns easily. Things You Will Need Adjustable wrenches Tip Prevent shutoff valves from freezing or becoming stiff by turning the valve on and off twice a year. Place a folded piece of paper towel on the adjustable wrench jaws or wrap it around the shutoff valve prior to moving the bonnet nut to avoid scratching the metal surface. Warning Adjustable wrenches can scratch the metal surface of shutoff valves if they are held too tightly in their jaws. google_ad_channel = ‘4818890251’; google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘4’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘336×280’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_skip = google_adnum; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label = ‘top’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored Links’; References This Old House: Stuck Shut-Offs Photo Credits Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images Suggest a Correction How to Free Stuck Plumbing Valves How to Open Stuck Plumbing Shutoffs How to Turn off Water to the Bathroom Sink How to Locate the Shutoff Tap for Water at a Kitchen Sink google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_channel = ‘9557755723’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘5’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘160×600’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label = ‘top’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored Links’;

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve
Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve
Bathroom Sink Shut Off Valve

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